New Look 6345: Sewing the Boho Look

IMG_3281Whenever I think of outdoor concerts, I think Boho, that loose, free-spirited look the cool seventies girls made famous. Think Ali McGraw, Stevie Nicks.

Ali (yes, we’re on a first name basis) had the perfect body for boho – -tall and lanky.

American actress Ali MacGraw, 8th March 1971. (Photo by Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
American actress Ali MacGraw, 8th March 1971. (Photo by Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

But Stevie DEFINED the look. Love the handkerchief hem here and those boots that made her look so tall.

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When I was invited to a concert in an outdoor venue, I looked to these girls for inspiration!

Of course, boho is one of those looks that doesn’t work for everyone. If you have curves, the flow-y dresses can make you look heavier than you are. And if you’re a short girl like me, well, most experts will tell you that loose, oversized clothes are a big no-no. They just swallow us up!

IMG_0512I guess there are worse ways to die though, right? Because I love a flow-y dress or top with a seventies vibe. Those loose clothes stand for independence! Free Spirits! Music festivals! Free love! Not to mention, the clothes are really, really comfortable.

When it came time to search for a pattern, I was surprised at how hard it was to find something with the vibe I was looking for. Finally, I found New Look 6345, a  dress/tunic with a handkerchief hem (very Stevie Nicks, don’t you think?).

6345

It’s a v-neck, fitted through the bust, with a loose skirt. That made it perfect for the concert, because, when I wasn’t dancing, I’d be sitting cross-legged on a lawn. I made the  length a bit shorter, because I knew I’d be wearing it over jeans.

The fabric I chose is a rayon print (blue and white, no surprise there) from Fabric Depot, with a repeating pattern that runs lengthwise. The rows in the pattern seemed like mini-border prints to me, so I couldn’t resist cutting some out to use as trim around the neck and along the bodice seam. Sounds like an easy modification, eh? Just sew a bit here and there….no problem!

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Truth be told, applying the trim to the neckline was WAY HARDER than it looked.

IMG_3215Because my fabric was a lightweight rayon, it had a freakish ability to stretch. And as I stitched my self-made trim to the neckline, I think I pulled it just enough to make the neckline gape.

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So frustrating. You can see that gape in this photo. There’s also a spider on that chair that is freaking me out, but I digress.

I probably could have prevented this problem by cutting the trim on the bias (?), but that wouldn’t have worked because the print pattern runs lengthwise. To fix the gape, I tightened the neckline by adjusting at the shoulder seams. It helped, although it still gapes when I stand in certain positions (as you can see above). The top is wearable, but maybe I should have put a stiffer bit of interfacing in the trim before adding it? Or maybe a hugely padded bra would fix the situation, but, you know, those cool seventy girls DO NOT WEAR BRAS.  Thoughts?

If I wear chunky shoes, and wear my jeans with this top, I do feel a bit like Stevie Nicks! Yes, it takes a bit of imagination, but you get my drift. Outdoor concert, here I come!IMG_3391

Happy Sewing! And thanks so much for stopping by!

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10 thoughts on “New Look 6345: Sewing the Boho Look

  1. I LOVE the boho look and have always wanted to incorporate it into my wardrobe. Unfortunately I am curvy and I feel like I am wearing a tent. 😦 But I am still working on that perfect Stevie Nicks inspired look for me!! Love your top. The fabric definitely has a good boho vibe- and adding the trim to the neckline was brilliant despite it stretching a bit. Overall I think you did a darn good job! Enjoy the music!!

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    1. Me too! I’m such a seventies girl at heart. Sometimes those loose flowing things do feel like a tent (sigh). Thanks for liking my top! The trim wasn’t easy, but in hindsight, I’m glad I did it. And, fortunately, I don’t remember the agony I went through when I’m wearing it 🙂

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  2. It’s gorgeous, and looks very flattering! One trick I’ve used to cinch in gaping knit necklines is to run some shirring elastic inside the band. Just thread through the band with a large needle, and adjust the tension, tie a knot and pop the knot inside the band. It worked like magic for a few things I was (ahem) too lazy take off and fix.

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    1. Oh, what a fabulous idea! It sounds like a perfect way to cinch it up a bit without ruining the neckline trim. I’m going to give that a try! THANKS!!

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    1. Yeah, what do they know :)! The optical illusion was something I didn’t notice until I’d laid the pattern out, but it worked out so well, I too will keep that in mind when fabric/pattern shopping. It was a nice accident that taught me a thing or two. Thanks!

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