Butterick 6592 Three Ways

Me Made May has been so revealing! My pledge this year was to wear the me-mades that were taking up valuable closet space, but weren’t getting much use. That lead to some ‘aha’ moments. 1. I prefer tops made of rayon, jersey knit, cotton lawn or linen (I hate stiff cottons!). 2. I love wearing skirts, pants but dresses…? Not so much (but I love to sew them!) 3. I do not enjoy wearing sleeveless tops or dresses not matter how hot it is. Yes, I have a few, but I never wear them! I’ve always had a thing about my arms, that less is more, LOL. 

That last conclusion led to one of this post’s projects. I pulled all of my sleeveless tops from my closet, determined to add sleeves. Easier said than done.  As you all know, that remedy relies on a stash of remnants that includes pieces of fabric from past projects. I used to have buckets of remnants, but that was before my commitment to ‘tidy up’. I was convinced those remnants weren’t giving me joy, so I discarded/donated most  of them a month ago! What I wouldn’t give to have them back again!!

The good news…I was able to locate enough fabric to add sleeves to this first version of my new favorite pattern, Butterick 6592. Yes, the sleeves are tiny, but I do love this top now.

I used Butterick 6592 for the three tops in this post, and it has alot to offer.  

The bodice can be made with or without a peplum, and there are three sleeve options, which makes the pattern a good value if you ask me. It’s a simple pattern to complete. The bodice is shaped by darts and the neck opening is finished with a zipper. Fit on this one is easy. I cut my usual size according to my measurements and it fits like a dream without tricky modifications.

This is view A, and for this version, I used a vintage linen table cloth that I picked up at a estate sale. The trick here was to place the cut out details in the right place on the bodice and sleeves. I used the scalloped edges of the table cloth as the finish for the sleeves. this is the second top I’ve made from a tablecloth, and it was so fun to sew!

The loose fit makes this top really comfortable and cool. Yes, it wrinkles easily, but that’s linen for you! I know this will be one of my favorite tops this summer.

This last version of B6592 is made from a remnant of silk I found last summer in the bin at the Mill End store here in Portland. It doesn’t photograph that well, but the blue is really lovely, with contrast bits of gray and off-white.

This is view B, the peplum bodice with a modified sleeve (no ruffle). Silk is so fabulous to wear – – I don’t know why I don’t treat myself to its luxury more often. I like this peplum because it isn’t too flouncy. For this version, I shortened the waist by 5/8 of an inch because the peplum is supposed to hit above the waist.

It’s always so fun to see how a single pattern can be used to create different looks. Any pattern that provides so many fun options, gets a big thumbs up from me! Besides that, it only takes a couple of hours to complete — Make it this weekend! I searched Instagram and Pattern Review for other versions of this pattern, but didn’t find much. I’m not sure why it isn’t popular, as I can see more versions of this in my future.

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

New Pattern: Sew Over It Kitty Dress

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As a Sew Over It Pattern Insider, I had the opportunity to test Sew Over It’s latest pattern, the Kitty Dress. I love a good shirt dress (here and hereand this one is perfect with lots of design details and options that make it unique – a shawl collar, a gathered or paneled skirt, and your choice of sleeves or no sleeves at all.

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It’s the design of the Kitty dress that makes it tick all the boxes for me. It’s so versatile- – two bodice and skirt styles that you can mix and match!  You can choose a princess seam bodice or a two-dart bodice. Both choices can be paired with one of two skirts: either paneled or a gathered option.  Both skirts feature in-seam pockets, and all versions are cinched in at the waist with a waistband, which makes them look great on everyone.

If I had to rate the difficulty of this pattern, I’d say it’s a great option for an intermediate sewer, or for a beginner who wants to learn some new skills. The instructions are detailed and helpful, so it’s easy to dive right in!

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It’s no secret that I love sewing patterns that give you options so that you can play and modify as inspired. At first, since I’m a fan of a bodice with princess seams, I was drawn to option 1, but when I made my fabric choice, I changed to option two. My rayon print is colorful, and I felt the princess seam detail would be lost in the fabric’s design. So, instead, I paired the double-darted bodice option with the gathered skirt.

I love long flow-y dresses in the Spring and Summer, so I made my Kitty dress from a lovely rayon from Joanns’. This rayon has a bit of texture to it, giving it a casual crinkled look that I love. The drape of this rayon is perfect for my mid-length Kitty because it gives the skirt some swish! For added style, I chose the shawl collar, which has a bit of a vintage vibe.

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The double darted bodice was easy to sew – -just two pattern pieces, both shaped nicely by bust darts and waist darts. Because I have a large waist relative to my bust measurement, I made a test version to make sure the fit was accurate, and I’m glad I did.  I quickly realized the darts needed to be widened slightly to compensate for my non-standard waist.

Fitting the gathered skirt was easy. I used my hip measurements to choose the size to cut and it worked great without adjustments. Gathered skirts are so forgiving and so easy to sew!! I love the way this skirt looks and swishes in the mid-calf length. It’s all I was hoping it woud be.

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I love my Kitty dress, so much, version one is in my sewing queue( princess seams and sleeveless), maybe in a cotton lawn or linen for summer. The updated version of the Kitty is available at Sew Over It now.

The weather here in Portland is improving – I hope to take my Kitty outside for a test run soon!

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by.

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The Saraste Shirt, my Me-Made-May Hero

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When I completed the Saraste shirt, I wasn’t totally ‘in-love’ with it. In fact, I immediately pushed it to the far right side of my closet, the place where the ‘never to be worn’s’ go. It’s a sad corner and it makes me feel a bit guilty. It’s all the me-mades that were fun to sew, yet, when all was said and done, I couldn’t imagine actually wearing it.

That was the sad story of this recent reject, but everything changed when Me-Made May rolled around. This year, my pledge was a bit different. Since I already wear me-mades every day, I pledged to wear the ones that I abandoned, and try to analyze why. This is one of those makes.

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It might be the fabric that put me off. It’s a floral print and, when I purchased it, I thought it was a random print. When I laid it out on my cutting table, I discovered that there’s a strong repeat….pattern matching would be involved! Ugh. That discovery made me a bit cranky as I wasn’t sure I’d purchased enough fabric to make this work, but I managed to pull it off, carrying the pattern through on the sleeves and the back.

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I do love the fit of this shirt! The Saraste shirt is a pattern from Named Clothing’s book,  ‘Breaking the Pattern’.

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I’ve made several of the patterns in this book now (here), and they’ve all been fabulous. The Saraste shirt is one of my favorites with many elements I love: princess seams down the front, a back yoke, optional sleeves and a small collar that fits my short neck. The surprise detail is small cut- outs at the shoulder, which I love.

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They were a bit of a challenge though. My tip is to be sure to trace the pattern carefully, noting all of the markings accurately. I hadn’t done that and had to go back and add them in. Once I had that accomplished, it wasn’t too hard to make everything work. However, I’m a bit disappointed that the cut-outs don’t show that well in my print. I’m going to have to give this lovely pattern another try in a solid colored linen, so that those slits can shine!

My Me-made analysis – – I do love the print now, but at first glance, I wasn’t too excited about it in this shirt. However, I have worn it many times this month and have discovered that it goes with everything in my closet. The fit is perfect and the shirt is easy to wear. In fact, people compliment me when I wear it:)

Lesson learned…my first take on a make shouldn’t be my last.   IMG_6959

How are you doing with Me-Made May? Any new revelations?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

A Spring Jacket with Triangle Bound Buttonholes

IMG_6299For years, my sewing bucket list has included “Jacket with Bound Buttonholes.” Well, this jacket has triangle shaped bound buttonholes and I’m saying, close enough! Yes, they were a bit fussy to sew, but I’m glad I took the leap to do them on this project. I will admit that the first two were ‘nail biters’ for sure, made possible only by the able hand-holding of my jacket class instructor, the Marvelous Marla! I was so fortunate last week to attend a three-day jacket making class lead by her. She makes everything so easy. If you ever have a chance to attend one of her classes, I highly recommend them.

I’m always attracted to peplum style jackets and shirts (here and here), so when this Simplicity pattern was released last Spring, it was an immediate add to the ‘must-have’ list. The front of the jacket is simple, so I decided it was the perfect opportunity to try a new buttonhole. IMG_6228

Triangle shaped buttonholes are very much like bound buttonholes. Marla taught me the method that’s in the Palmer Plestch Couture handbook.  Also, there’s a good explanation on-line at the Seamworks website, as well as a few U-tube videos on the subject. cfc8da3ec10d207d781d2a9d04676495e052556dThe good news…Creating a triangle bound buttonhole isn’t that hard! The bad news…There is a bit of unavoidable risk when you have to actually cut into your fabric to create the hole:) I recommend that you try out the process using scraps of fabric to start. It is a bit tricky, but very worth it, if you ask me.

IMG_6351I love this fabric, a lovely cotton boucle’ from Bolt Fabric,  but it was not ideal for this project. The weave was so loose, it unraveled at a mere glance. However, I knew it would be perfect for this pattern so I was highly motivated to push through the challenge! I used my serger to finish the edges but had to be careful not to cut off any seam allowances as I did so. I also had to be careful not to stretch the fabric as I pressed the jacket seams. The front of the jacket is completely interfaced and I lined the jacket with a simple rayon lining.

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The fit of this pattern is a bit tricky as there is a side seam panel, rather than straight side seams.

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That being said, the jacket fit great without alot of adjustments.  I chose my size based on my measurements and it was really close! I shortened the waist a bit (I’m short waisted) and made a slight shoulder adjustment, but that was it. I had planned to add a mandarin collar, but when I basted it in, I didn’t like the look so left it off.

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The construction of the jacket wasn’t hard at all. In fact, if you’re looking for an easy, first jacket pattern to try, this would be a good candidate. The pattern instructions are edited by Threads magazine so they include finishing tips that are quite helpful.

I love my new jacket, but to be honest. I’m not really sure about this color. Melon/orange is a new color for me, but I decided it’s high time I stretched my wings a bit. I’m wearing this jacket with jeans because I couldn’t figure out what other colors would work with it. Ideas?

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Next on my sewing ‘to do’ list is a trench and a new Sew Over It Pattern Insider project that I’m anxious to share. Stay tuned.

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!