#sewjapaneseinjuly meets #tableclothrefashion

July was a big month for sewing challenges. There were so many on Instagram, I coudn’t keep track of them all. For me, two challenges stood out above the rest: #sewjapaneseinjuly and #scarfrefashion, which also includes tablecloths. Yes, my last post was about a tablecloth refashion, but as you all know, one thing always leads to another for me, and that project was so fun. I guess it isn’t too surprising that I had to do another revashion before July was done.

But first, my #japeneseinjuly make…

IMG_2306 This is the Summer Jacket from the Nano Iro sewing studio book.

 

Nano Iro is a watercolor artist who creates beautiful textiles. Her designs are transferred to cotton and linen, which are perfect for clothing. Not only does she create beautiful textiles but she is an author. On a recent shopping trip to Bolt fabric here in Portland, I discovered that her recent book has been translated to English! Of course, I couldn’t resist….this is the summer jacket from that book.

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To me, Japanese sewing books are great because the styles are simpler and cleaner which allows the fabric to take center stage. That’s why, for this jacket, I reached deep into my stash for one of my favorite pieces of linen.

 

IMG_2318My linen has the tiniest bit of sheen which makes the denim color really pop.

IMG_2241I love the classic lines and the shawl collar of this summer jacket. The construction is basic but clever…the shawl collar is supported by a back neck facing that keeps the neck from rolling.  The pockets are patched onto the jacket, which gives it a utility jacket feel, so on-trend! It’s unlined so construction is a breeze. If you can set in a sleeve and attach a basic collar, you’re good to go! Use a medium weight fabric for this project with a bit of drape.  IMG_2305This style works with everything in my closet – – I suspect this jacket will be in my suitcase when I go to Italy this September!

On to the  tablecloth refashion…

IMG_2284This is the Basic Blouse, cut from a circular vintage table cloth purchased at an estate sale. I wish you could see from these photos that the cut detailing is embroidered with blue thread – – Love!!

 

Construction of this top was simple..The sleeves are cut into the bodice so there’s nothing much to it. The trick was in the layout….I had to place the cut detailing appropriately. I used the scalloped edge of the tablecloth as the hem and the center of the tablecloth as the yoke of the bodice. The sleeves are highlighted with more cut detailing, and after some tricky maneuvering I managed to get the sleeves to mirror each other. IMG_2287I added a back slit at the neckline and finished it with bias binding.

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I love my new outfit…and to think both pieces were inspired by sewing challenges! What challenges are you inspired by?

IMG_2190 Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

Linen Tablecoth Top for #scarfrefashion and #so50vintage

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I have a love/hate relationship with Instagram, I must admit. I love seeing everyone’s makes but I find the limitations imposed by the IG algorithm to be so frustrating. Sometimes, my feed is so edited by Instagram, I don’t see the content I choose. Nevertheless, as you all know, I do love a good sewing challenge and Instagram is full of them! So, I will stop complaining and get on with it….:)

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This linen top (a bit wrinkled having just been worn) was inspired by two sewing challenges on Instagram: the #scarfrefashion challenge (includes tablecloths too) sponsored by @sewstoney and @sewdalaridada, and the #so50vintagechallenge. I happened upon a vintage linen tablecoth with beautiful cut work and mitred corners at a estate sale. I’ve made tops from tablecloths before (here and here) so I knew this one was perfect for a top. I couldn’t resist giving the challenge a whirl.

With a little over a yard of fabric to work with, my style options were a bit limited. After perusing my extensive (!!) pattern stash, I came upon Simplicity 8090, a pattern from 2016 that has all sorts of possibilities.

I chose view C because it doesn’t take alot of fabric and it’s cropped, which allowed me to use the finished edges of the tablecloth as the hem for the top.

The pattern was so easy to sew. The sleeves went in perfectly. The front placket was really easy because I used the finished edge of the tablecloth for that. I only made one modification – I added a collar stand.

I do love the french darts on this top. They look so crisp in linen.

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This top has a seam down the back so I positioned the bodice pieces so that the tablecloth’s cut detailing would be on either side of the seam. I cut the sleeves to use the tablecloth detailing and hem too.

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The inside of the shirt looks fabulous because the hem of the tablecloth finished all the seams for me, LOL!!

All in all, it was a fun project, and I’m pleased with how it turned out. The biggest challenge was the laying out the pattern properly, of course, but the extra time involved was worth it.  I do love the boxy cut of this top and know I’ll use this pattern again. Vintage linen is so lovely to work with, I’ll never be able to resist an old tablecoth again!

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Are you taking on any sewing challenges this summer? Let me know so I don’t miss it! I love seeing everyone’s makes….

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

New Pattern Release: Sew Over It Bonnie Top/Dress

IMG_1008 3Hi All – – When I saw the sketches of the new Bonnie Top from Sew over It London I was thrilled. If you’re like me, you have a closet full of high waisted pants/skirts, but no tops to go with. I knew that this lovely ‘cropped’ top would fill a hole in my wardrobe. Not only that, but the Bonnie top has pleats! IMG_1005 2The Bonnie has a 1940s vibe with its defined waist, button up front and vertical pleats. It has a cute flat collar and short sleeves with little turn-up cuffs, a design detail that is subtle but effective. I like that the button placket is concealed – – it makes it a bit more polisihed – – a top that can go to a dress up event. There’s a dress version as well that has a knee length gathered skirt and a comfortable elastic waist.  I do love the pleats, but if you want a faster make, there’s a version of the Bonnie without pleats too. I know there will be a version of that view in my future.

I used a lightweight rayon for my version of the Bonnie, and it worked perfectly. Sew Over It recommends rayon/viscose, lightweight crepes, georgette, chiffon or very fine cotton voiles, in other words anything soft and drapey. I’d warn against anything heavier like a stiff cotton. The pleats wouldn’t have a chance to shine. If you are making the pleated version, the wider the fabric the better, as you need lots of room to lay out the front bodice as the pleats make it fairly wide.

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Fit and sizing – – I made my size according to my measurements and it fit nicely, without adjustment. I spent a bit of time fussing about the fit of the waistband, but I shouldn’t have bothered. The buttons don’t extend there so the waistband falls open ever so slightly…the fit isn’t tricky at all.

Construction– -When it comes to the pleats, I found the trick was to carefully mark them on my fabric. From there, construction was simple…. All I had to do is fold, press and sew!  Thankfully, the Bonnie  has very clear markings. I transferred them using a chaco marker. Once I’d accomplished that, pleat constructions was easy and fast. The concealed front placket was pretty simple too  once I had the markings transferred.

IMG_0998.jpegI love my new Bonnie top and plan to wear it with my high waisted skirts (the skirt I’m wearing is blogged here), pants, perhaps even with jeans. I can imagine an even dressier version out of silk or chiffon, and the dress version is on my ‘must-make’ list. Really, the Bonnie is one of my favorite Sew Over It patterns! Thanks to the Sew Over It London team for giving me the opportunity to make this lovely pattern!

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

As a Sew Over It Pattern Insider, I received a download of this pattern for free, but the opinions expressed here are my own. 

An Easy Burda Dress You Can Sew in Two Hours

IMG_1018This dress was a spur of the moment project. I decided the morning of an event that I wanted a new dress to wear that afternoon. There’s nothing like waiting  until the last minute, eh?! It’s too bad that #Jiffyjune is over because, honestly, this project has jiffy written all over it. It took less than two hours from start to finish.

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Fortunately, I had the perfect pattern for a last minute sew waiting in my stash.

This Burda pattern (6345) is a real keeper. I understand from the Burda Style website that it was featured in the magazine in 2016 (6/2016/101). I didn’t subscribe back then, so missed it, but it was instant love when I saw it in the Burda pattern book this summer.

This dress is so easy, yet the design is so visually interesting. The sleeves are part of the yoke, which makes sewing so simple.

IMG_1026I used a medium weight jersey that I had in my stash (yeah, a stash buster).  The pattern suggests using stripes because the design is such a perfect canvas for ‘stripe play’. I love how changing the direction of the stripes on the yoke really makes this dress pop! There isn’t a zipper to install…the dress just slips over your head. The neck is simply finished with a gand cut on the bias – so easy!

Because this pattern is made for knits, fit issues for me were next to none. I cut my usual size, and it fit without adjustments. I finsihed the seams with my serger, so even though this was a quick sew,  the inside of the dress looks great.

IMG_1020I’m so pleased with my spur of the moment dress! It will likely be my garment of choice tomorrow for the Fourth of July; Independence Day here in the states, since red, white and blue are the colors of the day.

 

I do love a quick, jiffy sew (am I the only one who sews a garment 2 hours before a party?). I have a bin in my pattern stash that’s marked ‘jiffy and some of my favorite patterns live there (hmmm, might be a future post?). It’s so nice to add this lovely new pattern to my  bin.  Thanks, Burda!!

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!