Butterick 5789, Cropped Drape Front Jacket

 

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Hi All! ‘Tis the season for indoor photos here in Oregon. It’s also the season to sew a few layering pieces, wearables that you can wrap yourself up in when it’s damp and cold (most days here). That’s why this cropped drape front jacket grabbed my attention. The style is so versatile – you can wear it closed, or open.

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My inspiration for this cropped jacket was a Ellie Tahari drape front sweater I saw on a recent ready-to-wear shopping trip. I loved the drape front, but hated the price tag. Honestly, it was several hundreds of dollars, and when you compare that to the cost of a sewn garment, me-made wins easily!

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Nevertheless, it is a gorgeous sweater. It almost made me want to learn to knit (ha).

For my version, I used a sweater knit, a wool blend I picked up at Mill End Store. It has a moderate amount of cross wise stretch, just enough for a drapey jacket.My pattern is Butterick 5789.

This is a drape front vest or jacket and the front extends into the back collar. I made view D and cropped it significantly (six inches all the way around). In order to make the front closure, I added a  button hole at the bottom corner of the drape front, then put a button on the opposite shoulder so that I could pull the ends up, criss-cross style.

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It’s such a wearable jacket, I know I’ll put it to good use right away. Honestly, this was so easy too. From cut to finish it only took two hours. Of course, part of this is because the front drape isn’t finished with a facing. That means the wrong side of your fabric shows. That’s not usually a problem with a knit though, as both sides of the fabric are usually okay to look at. I wonder which look I’ll wear the most?

 

I hope you’re finding time at this busy time of year to sew a bit. I’m contemplating a few ‘sewn’ gifts this year, but thus far have done nothing but dream about it, and of course it is alot of effort at a busy time of year, which can take some of the fun out of it. What do you think?  Are you sewing gifts this year?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

Butterick 5526- One pattern, three versions

There’s nothing like a sewing contest to inspire you to explore the long forgotten bins in your fabric stash! That’s where I found these cottons. They were perfect for my entry into Pattern Review’s ‘One Pattern, Many Ways’ contest. As I result, my stash is considerably smaller, and let me tell you, it feels great!

For my entry, I chose to make three versions of Butterick 5526, a button down shirt with variations. It’s a tried and true pattern for me (see it here).

In the past, making three frocks with button closures in four weeks would have driven me to drink. Why? Because I hate to sew buttons on by hand. Please, just shoot me instead.

Then, during a unplanned visit to Modern Domestic (Bernina and Fabric heaven, here in Portland), I discovered the Bernina button attachment (#18), a nifty gaget that does it for you in about five seconds (I am not exaggerating here). I begged Santa for it, and he delivered. Seriously, that attachment was a game changer. Bring on those buttons!

My shirt dress version was inspired by a Burberry shirt dress with a big bold plaid.

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No, I could not find that fabric anywhere, so I settled for this (Mill End Store).

img_0001To make my shirt into a dress, I just added seven inches to the length. Because the dress is very unstructured, I will wear it with a belt made from leftover pleather. I also added sleeve tabs so that I can roll up the sleeves when the weather is warm.

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Version two is a lacy top that I wanted to look a bit ‘boho’.

img_9921To make the top look less tailored and more relaxed, I eliminated the collar and cuffs, and added lace sleeves and trim. To add the lace to the bottom of the shirt, I cropped it at the waist, then added a swath of left over lace to the bottom, hemmed with a machine stitch.

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The fabric is embroidered linen (such a rare find around here), and it is so soft and comfortable to wear. I’ll likely pair this shirt this winter with a long cardi-vest. The linen was very fussy, and I was glad I had a serger to finish the frayed edges of this fabric. My only complaint about this version of the shirt is the pocket placement. It’s a bit high for me?

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My ‘kite’ version is just a straight version of view C. Nothing too challenging here, except for the linear pattern of the kites. They made the fabric layout surprisingly difficult, but they are worth it. Of course,  I LOVE this fabric. So many shades of  BLUE, and it was a joy to work with. There’s nothing like a crisp, cool cotton to make your sewing machine sing.

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So, that’s my quota of button down shirts for the next year. Because I’ve been a good girl and sewn three projects from my fabric stash, don’t you think I deserve to go fabric shopping? So far, I’m satisfied with my new stash elimination policy – – I must sew two projects from my stash for every new fabric purchase. I’m determined to make a dent in it!

I hope you’ll pop on over to Pattern Review to see all of the great makes in the contest. It’s so fun to see how you can take one pattern and make it something new. Do you have a favorite sewing pattern that you use over and over again?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

 

 

McCalls 7476-A cardigan for all seasons

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Hi All! Fall means cardigans because they are the perfect layer to throw over shirts and tee shirts when the weather begins to shift, so I’m always searching for new patterns. I was so pleased to find this new McCall’s option; a cardigan destined for ‘tried and true’ status. It’s easy and versatile with just the right amount of tapering for fit.

img_9071I like that it works with a collared shirt like this tie blouse, or over a collarless tee as well.

 

img_9707Because this sweater knit is pretty heavy with a bit of wool in the mix, I will likely wear it instead of a light-weight coat, so I made it really long. But I plan on making a shorter version with a shawl collar as soon as I can find another perfect knit!

The Details: My sweater knit is from Fabric Depot, a furry knit with lycra and wool in it, perfect for a cardigan jacket. The pattern is McCalls 7476, a cardigan with dropped shoulders, length options and collar variations.

m7476I love the fact that there are so many great options with this pattern. I cut my usual size small and didn’t have any fit issues. I wanted a snug fit when buttoned, but if you want a looser fit, you might want to jump up a size.

img_9692This pattern is super easy and fast to sew. I think from cut to finish it took me about three hours. I used a serger to finish my seams, but a zigzag would likely work.

It’s been a long while since I added a cardigan pattern to my pattern stash and this one has reminded me that I love them. If only I had a few more options to choose from. Do you have a favorite cardigan pattern? Let me know!

I hope your fall sewing is going splendidly. Thanks for stopping by!