Travel Mix and Match: Burda Culottes with Two Linen Tops

Hi All! In two weeks, I’ll be traveling to Italy, and there’s nothing like a deadline to get you motivated to sew, sew… SEW. Although I love to travel with dresses (this linen Burda will go with me) I’m going to stretch my options a bit by packing a few mix and match separates too.

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Burda refers to this pattern as shorts, but I consider them to be culottes. I love the wide cut in the leg contrasted with the paper bag waist. This pattern was in the Burda magazine (07/2019 #107A) and there were only TWO pattern pieces to trace…Yahoo! Because I was going for the culotte look, I lengthened them by two inches. Cut from linen, I think they’ll be perfect for Italy’s soaring temperatures.

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The paper bag waist is formed by pleats that are stitiched down at the waist. I decided to add a belt to make the waist more dramatic when I wear them with a shirt tucked in.  I also added in seam pockets – – honestly I can’t live without pockets!

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I’m wearing the culottes with my new Cuff Top by the Assembly line. I love this pattern. It’s simple but unique with sleeves that are gathered at the cuff by wide elastic. Because the sleeves are cut as part of the bodice, it’s really pretty easy to put this top together. The design details are what make this top special to me…the front seam (flat felled and top-stitiched with a double needle) and the wide boat neck (also topstitiched with a double needle).  Because the front of this top is seamed, you could use contrasting fabric to great effect. I’m imagining another version in a stripe! This fabric is a lightweight gray linen, which should be perfect in the heat. 

My second travel top is also made from linen, New Look N6601. 

IMG_2816This wrap top looks much harder than it is to sew. The neck is pretty simple…faced with bias binding.  Luckily, I had enough fabric to make my own. If you’ve never made your own bias binding, I highly recommend it.  It’s really a easy way to make the inside of your garment special. If you’re curious, check out the many tutorials on U-tube. IMG_3066.jpeg

Fit can be a bit tricky for me with wrap tops, but this is drafted so well, I made a slight adjustment for narrowed shoulders and called it good.

I’m really pleased with these additions to my travel wardrobe…there’s nothing like some new pieces to really heighten your anticiaption of a trip!

I know linen wrinkles, but I’m determined to travel with it anyway. It’s perfect for hot weather, and I’ll pack a portable clothing steamer for a quick touch up when needed. I still plan to sew more items for the trip, but time is running out……fingers crossed that I persevere!!  Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by.

 

 

 

Making a Wiksten Haori from a Mid-Century Modern Curtain

This Wiksten Haori was once a curtain in someone’s house.

IMG_1847.jpegThe leaf design on this fabric is typical of the mid-century modern style. It was all about the exotic, so tropical themes were big. Vintage drapes can cost as much as $200 per panel on Ebay. One Saturday afternoon, I got lucky.  I found mine at a estate sale for $10.

Estate sales can be such a great place to find vintage fabric and notions. My interest in them grew after I participated in the  #tableclothrefashion challenge on Instagram. I made a couple of tops from vintage tablecloths (here and Here) and had so much fun, I started exploring other vintage fabrics as well. I do love taking something old and making it new. Now, I can’t pass by an estate sale without taking a look.

IMG_1743.jpegThere was only one drapery panel at the sale so I didn’t have alot of this fabric to work with. This drape wasn’t lined, which meant it was ready for my project right away. The trickiest part of the make was figuring out how to best place my pattern pieces to let the leaf design take center stage.

This is the second Wiksten Haori I’ve made (first is here) so this make was pretty easy for me. I do love how the pattern is drafted so that the jacket is reversible.

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IMG_1719.jpegThis is the short verion of the Haori, lined with soft Chambray, the perfect fabric mate for my drapery barkcloth. Although I could reverse my Haori and wear it blue side out, I doubt I will – – I love the barkcloth side too much!

IMG_1820.jpegAs in my other version, this Haori has a lovely feel, in part because the barkcloth is soft but heavy.  That’s one of the reasons I love to wear this one so much. It feels substantial, but not too stiff. In my opinion, a medium weight fabric lined with a sleek lightweight fabric makes the perfect Haori.IMG_1847.jpeg I love the boxy shape of this jacket and the casual feel of the fabric. I know I’ll wear it again and again. Honestly, there’s a reason this is one of the most popular patterns around. It’s so fun to sew and wear. I can’t wait to make another!!  Now, if I could only find more vintage fabric….Sources anyone?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

My ‘go-to’ outfit: wide leg pants and a safari style top

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Each season, there’s one me-made outfit that seems to rise above the rest. This one is it! A pair of cropped, wide-legged pants and a linen Fringe top – -nothing unusual or particularly earth shattering about these makes. Yet,  I find myself reaching for them over and over again.

Honestly, these pants are the best thing I’ve made in a long while!

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Like every other sewing blogger, I have fallen in love with wide legged pants.  They have the double appeal of being stylish and easy-to-wear.  The fact that these were an easy ‘sew’ is the icing on the cake!

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Simplicity 8841 is an easy-to-sew pattern with a elastic waist and huge pockets. There’s a straightlegged version and a wide legged version, cropped or full length. I went for the wide-legged cropped version, a look I’ve really grown to love.

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I chose lightweight cotton chambray for this version. The fabric is so soft, these pants qualify as secret pajamas for sure! There are belt loops and a belt as well, so if I want to tuck something in, the elastic waist is well hidden.

This modified Fringe top is the perfect mate for these pants.

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If you aren’t familiar with Chalk and Notch’s Fringe blouse/dress pattern, I can highly recommend it! It was the darling of Instagram for a while, and I fell in love with the many variations I saw there. Search the #fringedresspattern hastag on Instagram and you’ll see what I mean!

To make my top, I modified View A to give it a bit more of a Safari vibe. I left the upper bodice and neckline as designed (and they fit like a dream!).  Then, instead of gathering the bottom bodice panel,  I cut it to fit the measurement of the upper bodice lower seam, plus a seam allowance. I also drafted darts on the lower bodice to mimic those on the upper bodice. The pattern suggests you insert the ties in the side seams or in the back bodice darts. I chose to put them in the back darts, and I think that’s part of the reason the bodice fits so well. I love the sleeve cuffs and the button tabs.

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The appeal of this pattern for me is the lovely v-neck and spot on fit of the bodice. I’ve already cut a dress version, and am interested in another top, likely another modified version. Yes, I was late to the Fringe dress party, but better late than never. This pattern will be a tried and true that will take me into Fall as well.

Fall sewing is on my mind, as well as a few added wardrobe items for a trip to Italy in September. My sewing machine is fired up and ready for a marathon of projects this month, so watch for more blog posts. There will be a few….:) Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!