Sew Over It Meredith Wrap Dress

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I was so pleased to be invited to be a Pattern Insider for Sew Over It patterns. I’ve been in love with their designs (especially the awesome Cocoon Coat here) so I’m excited to have the opportunity to show your their new release patterns here.

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The Meredith Wrap Dress was love at first sight for me. I do love a good wrap dress and this one did not disappoint. It comes in a short and love version with sleeve length variations.

I made the longer version, probably because the weather has been so cool here lately. As summer heat rolls in though, I might be inclined to shorten this hem a bit.

IMG_6130I’m so impressed with the fit of this dress! There isn’t a gap at the front and the neckline is just right, not too low like some patterns. I cut the size my measurements indicated and it fit perfectly, without any adjustments, always a win if you ask me:). Assembling the dress is pretty straightforward. Unlike some other wrap dresses I’ve tried, this pattern has one long front facing which makes it easy to stitch this dress together quickly. The two front bodices are mirror images of each other (rather than one bodice cut wide and one narrow to make the wrap), so the wrap closure is secure and comfortable to wear. The sleeves set in beautifully.  The tie is attached to the front facings before they’re stitched together.

 

IMG_6085I made my dress out of a soft jersey that I found at Modern Domestic here in Portland (also on-line). It’s the loveliest fabric to wear and sew with – – if only I could wear this dress all the time. It has just the right amount of two way stretch for the Meredith Dress. Really, any stretchy knit will do! I could imagine this in a silky rayon knit, or in a scuba knit too.

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The Meredith gets a big thumbs up from me, and there will likely be more of these in my future. I love my print jersey version, but could see this working well in a solid color. It would make a very elegant little black dress don’t you think?  Hmmm… The Meredith was just released, and it should be up on the Sew Over It website now.

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by.

Disclaimer: As a Sew Over It Pattern Insider, I receive a free pdf copy of the pattern in return for my review, but the opinion expressed here is mine:)

Sew Bibs with Simplicity 8610

IMG_5150There’s nothing like a community sewing challenge to motivate me to complete a project that’s lingered too long on my to do list. This pinafore pattern has been on my wish list since I made the jumpsuit version last Spring (here). It took the #sewbibs challenge to push me to get it done! (more about the challenge here)

My pattern is Simplicity 8610.

I love the big pockets, topstitched front band, buttoned straps. But if this doesn’t grab you, there are many other pinafore patterns to explore. Here are a few that are on my wish list right now.

The York Pinafore from Helen’s closet

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The Dani from Seamwork

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I chose Simplicity 8610 for the big pockets, front gathers and the cool bodice band detail. Also, I love the size of the straps, a detail that can make or break this design for me. If they’re too narrow, they’re uncomfortable, but these are just right.

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Construction – I cut the size indicated by my measurements and there were no surprises or adjustment’s needed. (Size options are from 6-24).  The construction of the bodice is pretty easy and fast to put together. Although I made my jumpsuit version from a rayon crepe, I decided to make my pinafore from a cotton, and I’m glad I did. I think the cotton gives the pinafore a bit more structure which works well to support the gathered details and the fabulous pockets (a must on a pinafore, don’t you think?).

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One of the nice things about this style is that you can wear it with a long or short-sleeved top under it which makes it a great layering piece. It’s still cold and rainy here, so I chose a long sleeve, but come Spring, I’ll happily wear this with a short sleeve top, or maybe even alone.

IMG_5192I’m such a fan of the pinafore style. I think it’s perfect for casual wear about town, or as a travel wardrobe item that you use as a layering piece. I know there will be other pinafores in my future, and since the challenge is on until April 12…would love to finish another before then:)

There are so many inspiring bibs and pinafores on #sewbibs on Instagram right now. Do you have a favorite bib sewing pattern to recommend?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

Perth dress: #So50Visible

IMG_4344 2This new linen dress was inspired by the challenge on Instagram, the #So50Visible, created by the #SewOver50 gang.  The idea of the challenge is to find a pattern where the photo features a model who is over 50. Sounds easy, Right? If only…. In my search for a pattern, I couldn’t find any over 50 models in McCalls, Butterick, Vogue or Burda. Simplicity had only two. I was shocked.

When I turned to the Indie patterns, I found a few more, and I’m so pleased that my search led me to this fabulous pattern, the Perth Dress and Top by Carolyn and Cassie (Carolyn is from the blog Handmade by Carolyn). The photos of the pattern include Carolyn herself as a model…fabulous!!  I haven’t made a pattern by Carolyn and Cassie before (Cassie is her daughter), so this qualifies this make for the #BGchallenge (Breaking Ground Challenge) too!

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The Perth dress is a shirtdress that includes some classic menswear details like a traditional collar stand and generously shaped collar. It has all the trimmings of a shirt dress, but without all of the buttons (yay) so if you’ve postponed making a shirt dress because of the buttons, this option is clearly for you!

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Details: My favorite detail on this dress is the button and the front pleat. It’s so cleverly designed because, by buttoning the collar, you create the lovely pleated front of the dress.  There’s also a back yoke, a black pleat and lovely in seam pockets. The style looks structured but it has the ease and flow of a flouncy, fun dress. Because the dress is loose fitting, you choose the size by your bust measurement.

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The pattern is expertly crafted with some great constructions details that are carefully explained by Carolyn. The back yoke is constructed burrito style. If you haven’t tried it, it’s a fabulous way to get a clean finish on the inside. The front pleat and collar and stand look much harder than they are. There’s one button, but two buttonholes, and it was fun to see how, by buttoning the dress, you suddenly have this wonderful pleat in the front. The only modification I made was to the dress was to shorten the collar points by about a half of an inch, just because I like a smaller collar.

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The success of this dress depends in large part on the fabric. In order for the dress to have some lovely movement, you need a fabric with the right amount of drape, but also with enough body to support the precise construction required for a collar and stand. Linen is perfect for all of these tasks, so I chose a lovely mustard linen from the Mill End Store here in Portland as well as a contrasting white linen for the collar. This fabric was amazing to work with – – it has a slight texture to it, a rare find that I wish I had more of.

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I love my new poufy dress and am so happy that this challenge led me to a new, fun pattern. Thanks to Carolyn and Cassie for bringIMG_4344ing this pattern to life with a real life model who is over 50. And I’m so grateful to everyone involved in the #So50Visible challenge. It’s fun, and informative and it made me much more aware. Let’s hope pattern companies take notice…

Happy Sewing and thanks for stopping by.

Sew Twists and Ties: the Ruska Knot Dress

 

When Named Clothing released their book, Breaking the Pattern, I could hardly wait to get my hands on it! I’m not a big fan of sewing books, but the Named Clothing designs really appeal to me (here, here, and here, ). Their modern, pared-down vibe is so contemporary and elegant. So, I asked Santa for a copy and he delivered.

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The book was even better than I expected. Breaking the Pattern is all about taking their basic patterns, and ‘breaking’ them apart with variations and hacks. The book comes with ten patterns with two variations each and instructions on how to do more. In fact, the ten patterns in the book can generate fifty variations (!!) which makes this book and its patterns an economical choice. The ‘easy’ patterns are at the beginning of the book..the hard ones at the end. All the patterns are included  – – you trace the ones you like.

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The Ruska knit dress caught my eye right away which isn’t a big surprise. These days, I’m really drawn to knit dresses. After watching a few episodes of Marie Kondo ‘tidying up’, I’ve been ‘Kondoing’ my wardrobe. Guess what! Knit dresses and tops consistently bring me joy (secret pajamas!!). They make great layering pieces too over tights, leggings, even jeans.

 

 

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The Ruska can be made as a basic dress, a tee or with a knotted tie in the front. It’s probably no surprise to anyone that I immediately went for the version with the knot in the front, LOL! Admittedly, I do have a ‘thing’ for ties, knots and twists (proof available here, here and here.) And, there’s a challenge on Instagram this month, hosted by Meg from Cookin and Craftin, Sew Twists and Ties, which I just can’t resist!

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For the dress, a firm knit with good recovery is recommended. For my first version (the aubergine version above), I used stretch velor (Britex.com) with medium stretch, but not great recovery. Yes, this fabric is a bit thick for this dress, but I have been trying for years to re-create a stretchy velor dress I had in high school! The dress turned out well, especially when you consider the fabric wasn’t perfect. The fit was good without fuss, and it felt stylish and comfortable So, I couldn’t resist trying the Ruska again with a another knit fabric.

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This knit from Joann’s is fabulous; a wool blend with great recovery. There’s such a difference in the look and feel of this dress. I made this version long (midi length) for fun. We’ll see if I leave it that long, LOL. I tend to favor shorter dresses because I feel more energetic in them for some reason. Maybe it’s the fabric against my legs that makes the difference? Obviously, the drape of this knit is better for the dress, and the fit is sleeker too.

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This dress went together quickly, and the instructions in the book were easy to follow. I was so pleased with the fit. I found my measurements on the size chart in the book and found it accurate. There really weren’t any construction challenges. The knot and tie look trickier to sew than they really are. The tie is part of an overlay piece that just fits over the basic dress and is attached at the shoulder and side seams.  The edges of the tie are finished with a narrow machine hem. Easy!

I’m giving this pattern a big thumbs up! The fit of the Ruska is such a winner for me, I’m going to use the basic tee option to sew to fill some gaps in my basic wardrobe. I’ll make the Ruska this summer with a colorful jersey, maybe even a stripe.

Yay!! A couple of new dresses that will ‘bring me joy’. (Are any of you as focussed as I am on ‘Kondoing’ my wardrobe, my house, my life???) This pattern was a great way to ease into using this book. I can’t wait to try a some of other patterns this Spring.

If you’ve been on the fence about buying it, give it a look. Yes, you have to trace the patterns, but the sheets aren’t nearly as crazy as they could be (Burda Style, anyone?).

Thanks to Meg at Cookin and Craftin for hosting this fun challenge! Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by.

Burda Style Cocoon Dress

I have to admit it…There was very little forethought behind these two new ‘makes’. I made these cocoon dresses on a whim….merely because I thought they would look pretty good with my new Cocoon coat (here)! Shallow…but true. Now that the 2018 RTW fast is over, I’m feeling quite free. I can sew anything I want without a single thought about whether I ‘need’ it to fill a hole in my wardrobe or not.  Frivilous sewing is the life for me!!

I’m such a sucker for a good knit dress in the winter, so if anyone waves a pattern in front of my face that gives me an excuse to make yet another one, I’m all in. And this one has pockets, which makes it perfect!

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I absolutely love a dress with side seams that wrap around to the front. I’m a big fan of stand up collars too….so Audrey Hepburn!

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Burda Style patterns have never been on the top of my list because they come in a magazine insert, so they all have to be traced onto pattern paper before they’re cut and sewn, and, well, I hate tracing patterns. I’d much rather buy a paper pattern, thank you very much. But the design of this dress was too good to pass up. So, I put on a binge worthy show just did it. This Burda Style pattern (1/2019/111) was worth the effort.

 

I loved the pattern so much I made two versions – – one from a soft, ‘poppy’ colored sweater knit I bought at the Mill End Store, and one from a textured sweat shirt jersey that I found at Joann’s (on sale!).

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It’s always interesting to see how different a dress/pattern looks with a two different knits. The gray textured jersey is a heavier moderate stretch knit so the dress and collar look more structured in that fabric. The poppy knit is so soft with a bit more stretch so the fit is loose and easy.

The dress went together easily. The collar is cut as part of the bodice so that makes things simple. The shape of the dress is created by the forward placement of the side seams. The hardest detail is the zipper at the back. Fitting is pretty straightforward…you can modify at the side or center back seam. I used a double needle for the sleeve hem and dress hem.

I love the neckline and the cocoon shape of this pattern – obviously, I’ll likely make it again. And the best part? Both dresses work under my new coat:)

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It’s always fun to follow an intense project like a coat with a less involved project, a palate cleanser! To be honest, the tracing of the pattern wasn’t as bad as I expected…really went pretty quickly and I’m getting better at figuring out all of those crazy lines on the magazine insert. So, there will definitely be more Burda Style makes in my future.

I  hope your New Year has had a strong start. I’m excited about all of the sewing happenings this month – – the Pattern Review Sewing Bee started this week. I’m not participating this year, but I love watching the fun. There should be lots of inspiration there. I’m hoping to make something for Sew Japanese In January, and there’s the Day/Night Dress Challenge coming up next month, hosted by Elizabeth Made This! Lots to look forward to…

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

My #Sewing Top Five Misses 2018

Each year, I enjoy a review of my #Sewing Top Five Misses almost as much as my best top five. I always learn so much from my mistakes. So without further ado, here they are!top-5-of-2018.

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  1. Vogue top – Okay, when I made this,  I felt pretty clever because I constructed this top from odds and ends in my fabric stash. Ha! It’s such a mashup of colors and textures, I feel oddly distracted when I wear it. What was I thinking? New Motto – – keep it simple. To the donation pile!

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2. Aernite pants. I really loved these when I made them, but the color of the linen turned out to be problematic. It didn’t really work with anything in my wardrobe and it made me feel blah too. Lesson learned….I will avoid peachy beiges and tans in the future.

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3. The Darling Ranges dress by Megan Nielsen is a new favorite (I made three (3) versions!), but this version did not work for me. Again, the issue is the color of the stripes in the linen. It’s too peachy for me. Also, I think the dress is too long(?) so I feel rather frumpy in it. So many problems here. Ugh. The embroidered linen is so gorgeous though…too lovely to part with. I’m going try to modify the dress (shorten it to a top?) or reuse the fabric in some way.

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4. Simplicity Vintage top: What? you say. But this one is Blue! How can it be a miss?

This top is a clear miss because it’s so annoying to wear. I kid you not. Because it’s basically a wrap top with only a front and back panel, it depends on the tie to hold in the sides. That means when the tie loosens as you wear it, you enter the danger zone. If you don’t run off to a private place to re-tie, you will soon be showing all sorts of things best left covered.  Bummer as I made three of these. Thumbs down on this one….to the pile!

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5. Long Kimono top; I should love this one…the fabric, the kimono style…but I’ve never worn it. I cannot seem to find an appropriate venue/occasion. There’s something so awkward about it…maybe the length? A head scratcher for sure because I do love, LOVE this fabric so much and the style gets a big thumbs up from me.  Maybe I’ll shorten it next summer or recut it as something else. Hmmmm. I’ve got some thinking to do on this one.

Lessons learned – –

  1. Fabric in tan or beige-y tones is a no-no for me. (sigh).
  2. Avoid patterns where the design includes an element that might potentially be awkward or where you might be naked if it comes ‘undone’, LOL!
  3. Even though I love the look of a long cardigan or kimono, long isn’t always that easy to wear.
  4. Fabric that isn’t in my color palate is best left behind.
  5. Simple fabric, simple designs…they always work!

Well, that pretty much sums up the good and the not so good of 2018. I have no complaints. All in all, it was a very good year. That being said, I’d like 2019 to look a bit different. I’m hoping for some new creative adventures to sweeten my sewing experience and am thinking a lot about how to make that happen.

A fresh year, a fresh start. How was your 2018?

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

 

My #Sewing Top Five of 2018

PicMonkey Collage_1Even though I prefer to look forward, I love doing this retrospective post at the end of every year. Thanks to Gillian of Crafting a Rainbow for inspiring the #SewingTopFive. So here we go…my top five makes for 2018.

  1. The layered lace Anthropologie knock off (full post here).

 

 

I chose this Anthropologie knock off as one of my best, not because I wore it alot, but because I had such a great time making it.  Even the first step of the process was fun. I visited all the local fabric shops, searching for bits of lovely lace, then layered them to create this textured bodice. It took alot of time, but I loved what I was doing so much, I didn’t really notice.

2. This New Look dress took me by surprise! The two versions are here and here, but I’m counting them as ‘one’ for the purposes of my ‘best of’ list.

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I didn’t really expect this drop waist loose-fit dress to become a favorite. It was a such a simple project…but sometimes it’s the ‘easy sews’ that yield the best results.

3. Pastel Green Coat (full post here)

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This was the only ‘serious’ coat I made in 2018 and it has become a strong favorite. The wool was a great find; gorgeous and soft. I’m so glad I decided to line the coat in silk. Pastels aren’t on my list of favorite colors as a rule, but I always feel like a ‘cool girl’ when I wear this coat.

4. Another Anthropologie knock-off made it into my top five list, the cordoroy shirt dress.

IMG_8454After multiple washings, the cordoroy has softened. I enjoy wearing this so much.

5.The floral kimono wrap top: IMG_1212

I always feel great in a wrap top/dress. This one is so fun to wear!

Here are a few Honorable Mentions: 

I would feel disloyal if I didn’t give a shout out to these me-made garments that have served me so well this year.

This Kobe Top from Papercut patterns:

I love this pattern, and will be using it again. This was a fun project because I used a old linen tablecloth with embroidery.

The floral wrap dress;

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I was reluctant to cut into this fabric because I loved it so. Fortunately, the dress turned out well. It’s now a favorite of mine…

3. Blackwood cardigan

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I made several Blackwoods in 2018 and I love them all! This particular version was special because I was able to use the selvege to create a unique border along the front and sleeve bands.

The Inari Tee dress and top:

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I’m not sure why I waited to try this cool pattern! I wear the linen dress all summer and the tops (modified with a low peplum) are favorites too.

How was your 2018? It was a productive year for me. I managed to sew and blog three or more garments each month. Motivation to sew was easy to find, as I joined the Ready to Wear Fast sponsored by Goodbye Valentino. If there was a ‘hole’ in wardrobe, I had to sew or go without!

The RTW fast has been an interesting experience. It’s shifted my sewing significantly from spontaneous, muse-driven sewing to ‘sewing with a purpose’. Intentional sewing meant I was able to fill some holes in my wardrobe that I’d ignored or filled with frantically purchased ready-to-wear garments. I’m glad I replaced those pieces with nicer me-made essentials. I also reduced my fabric stash significantly…a big win! I discovered that there are some things I just don’t like to sew, exercise wear, for example. I just don’t find the satisfaction quotient to be high enough to justify committing any of my cherished sewing time to it. It was good for me, so I will likely do the fast again!

In my sewing room, 2018 was a very good year. But alas, there were a few missteps along the way so I’ll post the Top Five Misses next.

I hope those of you who blog/instagram will post your top five too, as I love reading those posts. Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

 

An Anthropologie Inspired Burda Top

 

mL2l3J35Qjulp7CwY9UopA_thumb_11013If you ask me, the November and December issues of Burda Style magazine were so great, they more than justified the hefty price of U.S. subscription. This Anthropologie inspired make is from the November issue, and it’s just one of five patterns that I marke to trace. Yes, I always dread the task of tracing the patterns from the magazine…there are so many crazy lines to sort through! But the results were worth the effort!

Here’s the Velvet top from Anthropologie that inspired me to make this.  4110348695280_070_b

This Burda Style top is really close, minus the gathers at the shoulders.

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Navy blue is such a hard color to photograph so I’m not sure how clearly you can see the waist-pleat detailing, but it adds a nice touch and it was easy to sew. This Burda Style pattern is 11/2018 Style 110.

 

The magazine version is made from stretch jersey so I made my version from stretch velvet. If you try it yourself, I highly recommend a stretchy jersey with lots of drape. I cut the smallest size and the fit is great. I did forget to add the seam allowances when I first traced the pattern pieces and had to retrace them. UGH. There are so many crazy lines going every which way on those pattern inserts. I guess you could avoid that frustrating step by paying for a download of the pattern from the website, but to me, that feels like paying for the pattern twice which I could not justify, since, in the US, a subscription is already a sizeable investment. Fortunately, there aren’t alot of pieces to this pattern so the tracing wasn’t too hard.

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The required sewing was quite easy! I’m always impressed at how well Burda Style patterns come together.  The instructions feel so abbreviated to me, yet the projects always seem to work out! The front bodice and neckline are finished with facings and they’re very simple to attach. The sleeves are set in and they went in easily. The tie is just inserted before attaching the facing. No big deal. Machine sewn hems finish both the bodice and sleeves.

 

 

 

 

I always worry about fit when I make a wrap top. There’s so much that can go wrong in terms of gaping in the front. Because of that, I celebrate when I find one that fits well. Since this one is a clear winner, I’ll likely try it again. I might even add a few inches for a dress. It’s a great addition to the wardrobe since it can be worn alone or with a white collared shirt. Probably a lacy tee would look great under it too.

It’s always great to add a new velvet piece to my wardrobe, since I am such a fan! I’m hoping to sew a few more things before I do my yearly wrap up, but it could be wishful thinking on my part:). Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

A Gift to Sew: How To Make a Fringed Circle Vest

PicMonkey Collage-8Sometimes the simplest make gives you the most pleasure. Every time I wear one of these vests, I feel stylish, cozy and comfortable. It’s a simple design that brings compliments and the question….where can I buy that?

My love affair with circle vests started several years ago when I was gifted a pattern for one. I soon realized I didn’t really need one at all since it’s just a circle. But the trick is in the proportions.  The patterned vest was a bit too voluminous for me, and it wouldn’t fit under my coat. So, I played around with the concept using fabric scraps and muslin and came up with an updated variation that works better for me.

 

These vests are a great wardrobe addition because they can be worn open or closed. This particular version is reversible, made from two fabrics sewn together, a solid and a plaid. You can finish the edge with bias binding, but fringe is great too. To fringe a vest, sew around it at 5/8″ then use a seam ripper to pull threads from the edge to make the fringe.

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The short vest takes a yard of each of two fabrics. For me, the long vest can be made from a yard and 3/8.

The basic concept of a circle vest is introduced in this Thread magazine blog post. In a nutshell…

  • Circumference of the circle: your bust measurement
  • Distance between armhole: the width of your back from arm to arm
  • Depth of the armhole: Top of the shoulder to 3” below your armpit for the depth of the armhole.

I liked this method, but found the vest to be a bit short. So, I modified it by adding 3”to the width of the circle. I  did this to give the front of the vest more drape.

Here’s a double-sided flannel vest with bound edges. I used two heavy weight flannels so it’s cozy but a bit stiff. The edges are bound with fleece binding.

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Here’s the long version in boiled wool.

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To make the long version I added a few extra inches to the length of the oval. I eliminated the bias binding, fringing the edges instead. Here’s a visual of the pattern I drafted for mine.

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I only used a yard and a half of fabric by folding the fabric selvage to selvage and cutting my oval from that.

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I’m not sure which version I like the best….I’m such fan of plaids and this project is a perfect way to use them all!

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It’s always so satisfying to find make a stylish and unique gift for a friend. A unique fabric choice can really make this a stand out piece in any wardrobe. It’s also a great addition to your wardrobe too. As they say, One for you…One For ME!!! 

Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!

 

A Vogue Vintage Jacket in Plaid

IMG_9618 2 Hi all! I’m back from a bit of a holiday break with a plaid jacket, inspired by one I saw in Vogue pattern Magazine. If you’re like me, you look forward to each issue of the Vogue Pattern magazine because there is always something there that will spark an idea for a project. This issue was one of my favorites as it was all about PLAID.

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Love the plaid coat on the cover!! Inside, a vintage Vogue jacket caught my eye, and I knew I’d have to make my own version.

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It’s hard not to love a good Vintage Vogue design! Vogue 9082 is especially appealing because it has a cute cropped jacket.

 

I made my jacket from a plaid I found at the Mill End Store here in Portland on my usual Fall visit there. I’m always on the lookout for classic but fun plaids, and, as usual, they did not disappoint. This fabric is really lovely in person; photos don’t do it justice. It has a bit of olive green and gold in it, and it’s so soft, a blend of wool and acrylic. I was lucky enough to get the last two yards on the bolt.

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Challenges: The pattern is pretty straightforward and pretty easy, but hey, I had to complicate things by making mine from plaid. It was a bit of a challenge to lay the pattern out because the sleeves are cut as part of the bodice. This means you must be sure that you place the plaid on the bodice carefully because that line follows down the sleeve. The good news is…because you don’t set in the sleeve, it means you get to avoid the whole sleeve to bodice matching ordeal, The bad news…the wrong placement could mean you’d have plaid sitting awkwardly on your shoulder. My plaid was large so a mistake would be glaring but I think it worked out well. By the way, my success rate with matching plaid has increased considerably since I started using Wonder Clips to hold things in place while cutting and sewing. s-l640

I love these things so much! Just posting a photo of them makes me want to buy a zillion more. You can find them at Joann’s, at craft stores, on Amazon. They are so useful and all the colors….I could go on and on!!

More about the challenges – – those collar points!!  From the line diagram, it appears that the collar is designed to look a bit more angular and pointed than in my version. Not sure why, but mine aren’t quite as dramatic as I expected. I think the error happened when I cut the bodice. When I inspected the pattern pieces later, to my surprise, I’d cut the collar points as I expected them to be, rather than how they were. Perhaps it was because I was binge watching Outlander. Blame it on Clare and Jamie.

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I think the cropped style works best with my highwaisted denim skirt (made here). It would probably work with jeans too!

Future posts and plans….

The holiday season is in full swing around here. It’s my favorite time of year because I get to sing in several Christmas concerts with my choir, which is such a privilege and joy. It also means I’ll be sewing a few fun EASY gifts for friends…Curious if you are too?  My next post will probably be about that. In other news, the year is coming to an end, as is the 2018 RTW fast and I’ve been thinking alot about that experience and what it’s meant to my sewing journey so I’ll share those thoughts too. Then, of course there will be a hits and misses post for 2018. So much to talk about!

I hope you had a nice holiday with family and friends. Happy sewing and thanks for stopping by!